Stockpile Price List

Download the general stock-up price list below:

Download the blank personal stock-up price list below:

When couponing, it helps to be able to reference common stock-up prices to see if a deal is “really good” or not. I always say that you want to aim for at least 50% off your purchases, and it’s okay to grab a couple of items at that price. But if you can get something for 75% off, then that’s when you really want to go big on stocking up for several months at a time. If you are new to couponing, it’s okay to stock up on items when they are only 50% off! You have to start somewhere.

As you coupon more, you’ll learn which products you’re able to easily get for 75% or more off, and which products rarely get down that low. It’s okay to have products you buy that don’t ever reach 75% off! Several of our household products are hard to coupon for and I usually go big on stocking up if they reach just 40-50% off. Couponing is all about personalizing your stockpile for yourself and your family.

Prices also vary by region, brand, store, size, etc. So I like to keep a personal stock-up list where I track my own purchases, which helps me know whether a deal is “good” for our family or not. For instance, some people are happy to get diapers at just $.15/per diaper since regular price is usually $.25+/per diaper, but I can routinely get Huggies for $.10/per diaper, therefore I would never buy them for more than that. But if your particular brand of diapers is more expensive and you can only stock up at $.15/per diaper, then go for it! It’s all about what works for you.

On my personal stock-up list, I just write down the item, price, store and date in pencil. If I ever find the item cheaper, then I erase the price, store and date and replace with the new information. So I can look back right now and see that I got a package of three bell peppers at Aldi for $1.99 during their sale last month. I like to chop and freeze peppers for recipes when I find them on sale, since they tend to be a little expensive regular price. So if Publix is having a sale for a package of three bell peppers for $2.99, I can quickly look and see that I actually got them $1 cheaper at Aldi last time – and I’ll usually wait to stock up until I see that $1.99 sale again, rather than stocking up during the Publix $2.99 sale. See how that helps? Just because you see a “sale” sign doesn’t mean it’s a rock-bottom, stock-up price! You want to get familiar with what your true sales prices are so that you’re not tricked into buying a product on sale if that’s not really the cheapest you can get it.

The example above is also why you want to keep at least a small stockpile. We live in an apartment, so we don’t have tons of storage space, but I still try to keep a handful of each product in our stockpile so that I’m not forced to pay regular price if we run out and I can’t find another good sale. Some sales only come around every 3-6 months, so when you find a REALLY good sale, get as many of that item as you’ll use for the next six months. We currently have enough toilet paper in our guest room closet to last about five months. Do my guests have to stare at stacks of Charmin when they stay with us? Yes. Do I care? No. I’d rather my mom see a stack of Charmin while visiting for a week than pay full price when I know I can stockpile toilet paper for 75% off during a major sale.

Download the general stock-up price list below:

Download the blank personal stock-up price list below: